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4 edition of Use of Viruses For the Control of Insect Pests and Disease Vectors found in the catalog.

Use of Viruses For the Control of Insect Pests and Disease Vectors

World Health Organization

Use of Viruses For the Control of Insect Pests and Disease Vectors

Report of A Joint Fao/Who Meeting on Insect Viruses.

by World Health Organization

  • 207 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

1

SeriesTechnical report series (World Health Organization) -- 531
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21754962M

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has defined pesticide as. any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying, or controlling any pest, including vectors of human or animal disease, unwanted species of plants or animals, causing harm during or otherwise interfering with the production, processing, storage, transport, or marketing of . new insect vectors. Furthermore, a group with only a few insect vectors still may be able to carry and spread a huge number of viral diseases to many different host plants, as occurs in the whiteflies and thrips. In , more than viruses were known to be transmitted by these insect vectors; however, in the last fiveFile Size: KB.

On the other hand, viruses that are pathogenic to insect pests can be exploited as attractive biological control agents. Another fascinating feature of these viruses is that some, e.g. baculoviruses, have been commercially exploited for use as gene expression and delivery vectors in both insect and mammalian cells. In this article we consider the role of epidemiological factors and transmission processes of insect-vectored viruses on the effectiveness of insecticides in a disease management program. We also discuss the use of insecticides within the broader framework of the chemical environment surrounding vectors, and how chemical-induced alterations in the behavior of vectors can .

Vector control is any method to limit or eradicate the mammals, birds, insects or other arthropods (here collectively called "vectors") which transmit disease most frequent type of vector control is mosquito control using a variety of strategies. Several of the "neglected tropical diseases" are spread by such vectors. Start studying Exam 2- Pests and Pesticides. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. cause discomfort or are vectors of disease. Resource Competition. crops % of harvest lost each year to pests (insects, weeds, plant pathogens) using growing insect predators to control pests; scale insects.


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Use of Viruses For the Control of Insect Pests and Disease Vectors by World Health Organization Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The use of viruses for the control of insect pests and disease vectors; report of a Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Insect Viruses, Geneva, November Get this from a library.

The use of viruses for the control of insect pests and disease vectors: report of a Joint FAO-WHO Meeting on Insect Viruses, Geneva, November [Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Insect Viruses.] -- "The Red Lanterns fought amongst themselves in a brutal civil war, but now they must band together against the universal threat of Guardians of.

Introduction. Insect pests, pathogens, and weeds are major causes of loss in food production. In an effort to mitigate these losses, control of pest populations has traditionally relied heavily on the use of synthetic broad-spectrum insecticides (organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, neonicotinoids); however, prolonged use of insecticides is detrimental to the environment, a.

Origins of agriculture - Origins of agriculture - Pest and disease control in crops: Wherever agriculture has been practiced, pests have attacked, destroying part or even all of the crop. In modern usage, the term pest includes animals (mostly insects), fungi, plants, bacteria, and viruses. Human efforts to control pests have a long history.

Conference Title: The use of viruses for the control of insect pests and disease vectors. Report of a joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Insect Viruses.

Report of a joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Insect Viruses. Abstract: This report of a joint FAO/WHO meeting of international experts in Novemberconsiders viruses which infect insects insects Subject.

Pathogenic viruses have long played an important role in the biological control of insect pests. In this century mankind has made efforts to manipulate naturally-occurring pathogens to its advantage. Instead of waiting for virus disease to appear in populations of pest insects, viruses are collected, mass cultured, formulated, packaged, stored Cited by: 5.

TNAU scientists are using viruses to control three insects -- the American bollworm, the tobacco cutworm and the red hairy caterpillar that attacks the groundnut crop. The American bollworm affects about 40 to 50 crops, including major ones like cotton, chickpea and tomato.

Genetics of insect viruses 6. Use of insect viruses as biological control agents Production Application Examples on the use of Insect Viruses in the Field Important Considerations When Using Viral Bioinsecticides Advantages and Limitations Development of Resistance to Insect Viruses File Size: KB.

Roger A.C. Jones, in Advances in Virus Research, Transmission by Arthropod Vectors. Horizontal insect virus transmission by arthropod vectors is considered by insect virologists to be an indirect horizontal transmission pathway as it involves another biological agent (Chen et al., a,b).In contrast to the situation with plant viruses, with one exception arthropod vector.

key control method.[4] The aphid vectors’ rapid trans-mission of virus without a latent period and during exploratory feeding probes makes reducing of virus spread by killing incoming aphids with insecticides ineffective.

PLANT VIRUSES Virus Vector Groups Most vectors of plant viruses are sucking insects in theFile Size: KB. This book provides recent contributions of current strategies to control insect pests written by experts in their respective fields. Topics include semiochemicals based insect management techniques, assessment of lethal dose/concentrations, strategies for efficient biological control practices, bioinsecticidal formulations and mechanisms of action involving RNAi technology, Cited by: 2.

For example, one way of controlling malaria is to control the mosquito vector through the use of mosquito nets, which prevent mosquitoes from coming into contact with humans. This is a list of diseases spread by invertebrates. Viruses are associated with insects in a wide range of ecological relationships; as pathogens, plant and animal viruses associated with insect vectors Author: Martin Erlandson.

Control of the insect vector remains the major point of control of virus infection and this is heavily reliant on insecticides. Since current approaches are not sufficient to control virus spread and insecticide resistance is rising [,], there is a current emphasis on insect vector–virus interactions and novel insect control by: For this Special Issue, we encourage authors to contribute original research articles on the current status of arthropod vectors and vector-borne diseases, with a special emphasis on alternative approaches to controlling vectors of disease, host–pathogen–symbiont interactions, insect pathogen resistance, functional genomics, vector ecology.

Analysis of sampling: Samples of honey bees, bee parasites and hive products (wax, honey, propolis, and pollen) are currently being analyzed by different groups for the presence of disease-causing organisms, viruses, parasites, and chemical contaminates.

Additionally, molecular and genetic analysis of the bees and pathogens is being conducted. These viruses and bacteria threaten growers in the U.S. The purpose of this project is to develop transgenic crops expressing resistance/immunity to viral, bacterial and insect pests/vectors, and to conduct research concerning the molecular basis for plant-viral interactions.

Insect-pathogenic (= entomogenous) fungi can be divided into two broad categories: the specialists and generalists (for a summary of the attributes of Author: Tariq M Butt. About The Book. This is a multi-authored book concerning the perceived threat and recorded increase of emerging pests and vector-borne diseases affecting man and animals in Europe.

Historically, Europe suffered from numerous pests and vector-borne diseases, including yellow fever, malaria, plague and typhus. Objective III: Assess potential of fungal pathogens and other biologically-based agents such as insect growth regulators to reduce rates of disease transmission by insect vectors and to achieve control of agricultural pests, with the long-term goal of implementing new strategies in California to control insect pests.

(2) Discovery and development of predators, parasitic wasps, viruses, and other biological control agents for mosquitoes, and filth flies and enabled pesticide-free control of pests and vectors.

(3) Development of molecular and morphological diagnostic tools for mosquitoes facilitated the accurate identification of disease vectors. 6.This work focuses on those insect virus families found primarily or exclusively in insects, covering all major families of insect-selective viruses except for the baculoviruses which were described in a previous volume of The Viruses series.

Included are the established families of insect viruses, the newly recognized ascovirus family, and the nudiviruses, which probably represent a .The information on the different topics has increased since the authors finished writing it (end of September ), but this outstanding book is a useful beginning for the novice who wants to acquire, in a relatively short period, a nearly complete insight on the existing information concerning pests and vector-borne diseases in by: